FREE Lecture Series to be held in Rotorua

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The 2009 Malcolm Murchie and Hikooterangi Hohepa Lecture Series focuses on literacy and numeracy, particularly as it relates to Māori participation and success in vocational education.

25 August- Dr John Benseman

  • Adult Literacy and Numeracy: Strategies for Tertiary Institutions

22 September – Rawiri Te Whare

  • Central North Island Post-Settlement and the Provision of Tertiary Education

13 October – Sir Paul Reeves

  • Māori Participation in Vocational Education: Where We Have Come From, and Where We Are Going

5 November Professor – Russell Bishop

  • The Kotahitanga Programme: How Could this Approach Apply to the Tertiary Sector?

17 November – Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith

  • Facilitating Māori Student Success

Where: Distinction Rotorua, 390 Fenton Street, Rotorua
Time: 5.30 – 6.30pm, followed by light refreshments

To register please email or phone

Dianne Hancox
P: 07 346 8987
E: dianne.hancox@waiariki.ac.nz

Additional Information

Dr John Benseman 25 August

Dr John Benseman has worked in adult education and literacy for more than 30 years as a practitioner and programme administrator, but mainly as a researcher and evaluator. He started his career as a primary school teacher, but became more interested in working with adults with their high levels of motivation to learn.

After studying adult education in Sweden for a year, he worked in continuing medical education at the Auckland Medical School, followed by seven years of running a community-based adult education organisation.

Following a period of self-employment as a researcher and evaluator, Dr Benseman taught adult education at The University of Auckland for 12 years and also worked in literacy research projects for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In 2007 he moved to the Department of Labour to run a workplace literacy, language and numeracy research project involving more than 500 workers throughout New Zealand. The project will be completed in late 2009.

Dr Benseman will discuss strategies for tertiary institutions in adult literacy and numeracy.

Rawiri Te Whare 22 September

Rawiri Te Whare is the general manager for Te Pumautanga and Te Arawa. He was a lead negotiator for the Central North Island (CNI) settlement achieved with the crown this year.

Mr Te Whare will talk about CNI post-settlement and the provision of tertiary education.

Sir Paul Reeves 13 October

Sir Paul Reeves is the chancellor of AUT University and is involved in the expansion and consolidation of this new tertiary institution. The university anticipates a difficult economic environment in the next two or three years that will require strategic decisions and careful management.

Sir Reeves is also the Commonwealth Secretary-General’s Special Representative to Fiji, and is the deputy chair of the Port Nicholson Settlement Trust which has now received the proceeds of the settlement made with the Crown in August this year.

Having chaired the Hui Taumata Trust for five years, Sir Reeves helped develop initiatives and work streams to assist the growth of the Maori economy.

Sir Reeves will discuss Maori participation in vocational education, focusing on the progress that has been made, and where the future leads.Murchie – Hohepa Lecture Series 2009

Professor Russell Bishop PhD 5 November

Professor Russell Bishop, PhD, is foundation professor for Maori Education in the School of Education at The University of Waikato, Hamilton. He is also a qualified and experienced secondary school teacher.

Prior to his present appointment he was interim director for Otago University’s teacher education programme. His research experience is in the area of collaborative storying as kaupapa Maori research, having written a book “Collaborative Research Stories: Whakawhanaungatanga”, and published nationally and internationally on this topic.

Additional research interests include collaborative storying as pedagogy, and culturally responsive pedagogies. Bishop has authored numerous journal articles and research reports, and has made many academic and public presentations on the topic of improving the educational achievement of indigenous and minoritized students. Books he has authored and co-authored include “Collaborative Research Stories: Whakawhanaungatanga”, “Culture Counts: Changing Power Relationships in Classrooms”, “Pathologising Practices: The Impact of Deficit Thinking on Education”, and “Culture Speaks: Cultural Relationships and Classroom Learning”.

He is currently the project director for Te Kotahitanga, a New Zealand Ministry of Education funded research /professional development project that seeks to improve the educational achievement of Maori students in mainstream classrooms through the implementation of a culturally responsive pedagogy of relations.

Professor Bishop’s presentation will focus on the Kotahitanga programme and how this approach could apply to the tertiary sector.

Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith 17 November

Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith is pro vice-chancellor Maori and professor of Education and Maori Development at The University of Waikato. She has previously been joint director of Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga, the Maori Centre of Research Excellence and director of International Research Institute for Maori Education based at The University of Auckland.

Professor Smith’s research career bridges health and education. Her first research experience was on a multi-disciplinary asthma management study led by professors Harry Rea and Stuart McNaughton and was funded by the Medical Research Council.

Professor Smith is well known for her 1998 book, “Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples”, and other writings on research methodologies such as kaupapa Maori research. She is currently a member on the Health Research Council and Chairper­son of Maori Health Council and New Zealand Association for Research in Education.

Professor Smith’s lecture topic is on facilitating Maori student success.

Dr John Benseman 25 August
Dr John Benseman has worked in adult education and literacy for more than
30 years as a practitioner and programme administrator, but mainly as a
researcher and evaluator. He started his career as a primary school teacher,
but became more interested in working with adults with their high levels of
motivation to learn.
After studying adult education in Sweden for a year, he worked in continuing
medical education at the Auckland Medical School, followed by seven years of running a
community-based adult education organisation.
Following a period of self-employment as a researcher and evaluator, Dr Benseman taught
adult education at The University of Auckland for 12 years and also worked in literacy
research projects for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In 2007 he
moved to the Department of Labour to run a workplace literacy, language and numeracy
research project involving more than 500 workers throughout New Zealand. The project
will be completed in late 2009.
Dr Benseman will discuss strategies for tertiary institutions in adult literacy and numeracy.
Rawiri Te Whare 22 September
Rawiri Te Whare is the general manager for Te Pumautanga and Te Arawa. He
was a lead negotiator for the Central North Island (CNI) settlement achieved
with the crown this year.
Mr Te Whare will talk about CNI post-settlement and the provision of tertiary
education.
Sir Paul Reeves 13 October
Sir Paul Reeves is the chancellor of AUT University and is involved in the
expansion and consolidation of this new tertiary institution. The university
anticipates a difficult economic environment in the next two or three years
that will require strategic decisions and careful management.
Sir Reeves is also the Commonwealth Secretary-General’s Special
Representative to Fiji, and is the deputy chair of the Port Nicholson
Settlement Trust which has now received the proceeds of the settlement made with the
Crown in August this year.
Having chaired the Hui Taumata Trust for five years, Sir Reeves helped develop initiatives
and work streams to assist the growth of the Maori economy.
Sir Reeves will discuss Maori participation in vocational education, focusing on the progress
that has been made, and where the future leads.
Murchie – Hohepa Lecture Series 2009
Professor Russell Bishop PhD 5 November
Professor Russell Bishop, PhD, is foundation professor for Maori Education
in the School of Education at The University of Waikato, Hamilton. He is also
a qualified and experienced secondary school teacher.
Prior to his present appointment he was interim director for Otago
University’s teacher education programme. His research experience is in the
area of collaborative storying as kaupapa Maori research, having written a
book “Collaborative Research Stories: Whakawhanaungatanga”, and published nationally
and internationally on this topic.
Additional research interests include collaborative storying as pedagogy, and culturally
responsive pedagogies. Bishop has authored numerous journal articles and research
reports, and has made many academic and public presentations on the topic of improving
the educational achievement of indigenous and minoritized students. Books he has
authored and co-authored include “Collaborative Research Stories: Whakawhanaungatanga”,
“Culture Counts: Changing Power Relationships in Classrooms”, “Pathologising Practices:
The Impact of Deficit Thinking on Education”, and “Culture Speaks: Cultural Relationships
and Classroom Learning”.
He is currently the project director for Te Kotahitanga, a New Zealand Ministry of Education
funded research /professional development project that seeks to improve the educational
achievement of Maori students in mainstream classrooms through the implementation of a
culturally responsive pedagogy of relations.
Professor Bishop’s presentation will focus on the Kotahitanga programme and how this
approach could apply to the tertiary sector.
Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith 17 November
Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith is pro vice-chancellor Maori and professor
of Education and Maori Development at The University of Waikato. She has
previously been joint director of Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga, the Maori
Centre of Research Excellence and director of International Research
Institute for Maori Education based at The University of Auckland.
Professor Smith’s research career bridges health and education. Her first
research experience was on a multi-disciplinary asthma management study led by
professors Harry Rea and Stuart McNaughton and was funded by the Medical Research
Council.
Professor Smith is well known for her 1998 book, “Decolonizing Methodologies: Research
and Indigenous Peoples”, and other writings on research methodologies such as kaupapa
Maori research. She is currently a member on the Health Research Council and Chairperson
of Maori Health Council and New Zealand Association for Research in Education.
Professor Smith’s lecture topic is on facilitating Maori student success.Dr John Benseman 25 August

Dr John Benseman has worked in adult education and literacy for more than 30 years as a practitioner and programme administrator, but mainly as a researcher and evaluator. He started his career as a primary school teacher, but became more interested in working with adults with their high levels of motivation to learn.

After studying adult education in Sweden for a year, he worked in continuing medical education at the Auckland Medical School, followed by seven years of running a community-based adult education organisation.

Following a period of self-employment as a researcher and evaluator, Dr Benseman taught adult education at The University of Auckland for 12 years and also worked in literacy research projects for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In 2007 he moved to the Department of Labour to run a workplace literacy, language and numeracy research project involving more than 500 workers throughout New Zealand. The project will be completed in late 2009.

Dr Benseman will discuss strategies for tertiary institutions in adult literacy and numeracy.

Rawiri Te Whare 22 September

Rawiri Te Whare is the general manager for Te Pumautanga and Te Arawa. He was a lead negotiator for the Central North Island (CNI) settlement achieved with the crown this year.

Mr Te Whare will talk about CNI post-settlement and the provision of tertiary education.

Sir Paul Reeves 13 October

Sir Paul Reeves is the chancellor of AUT University and is involved in the expansion and consolidation of this new tertiary institution. The university anticipates a difficult economic environment in the next two or three years that will require strategic decisions and careful management.

Sir Reeves is also the Commonwealth Secretary-General’s Special Representative to Fiji, and is the deputy chair of the Port Nicholson Settlement Trust which has now received the proceeds of the settlement made with the Crown in August this year.

Having chaired the Hui Taumata Trust for five years, Sir Reeves helped develop initiatives and work streams to assist the growth of the Maori economy.

Sir Reeves will discuss Maori participation in vocational education, focusing on the progress that has been made, and where the future leads.Murchie – Hohepa Lecture Series 2009

Professor Russell Bishop PhD 5 November

Professor Russell Bishop, PhD, is foundation professor for Maori Education in the School of Education at The University of Waikato, Hamilton. He is also a qualified and experienced secondary school teacher.

Prior to his present appointment he was interim director for Otago University’s teacher education programme. His research experience is in the area of collaborative storying as kaupapa Maori research, having written a book “Collaborative Research Stories: Whakawhanaungatanga”, and published nationally and internationally on this topic.

Additional research interests include collaborative storying as pedagogy, and culturally responsive pedagogies. Bishop has authored numerous journal articles and research reports, and has made many academic and public presentations on the topic of improving the educational achievement of indigenous and minoritized students. Books he has authored and co-authored include “Collaborative Research Stories: Whakawhanaungatanga”, “Culture Counts: Changing Power Relationships in Classrooms”, “Pathologising Practices: The Impact of Deficit Thinking on Education”, and “Culture Speaks: Cultural Relationships and Classroom Learning”.

He is currently the project director for Te Kotahitanga, a New Zealand Ministry of Education funded research /professional development project that seeks to improve the educational achievement of Maori students in mainstream classrooms through the implementation of a culturally responsive pedagogy of relations.

Professor Bishop’s presentation will focus on the Kotahitanga programme and how this approach could apply to the tertiary sector.

Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith 17 November

Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith is pro vice-chancellor Maori and professor of Education and Maori Development at The University of Waikato. She has previously been joint director of Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga, the Maori Centre of Research Excellence and director of International Research Institute for Maori Education based at The University of Auckland.

Professor Smith’s research career bridges health and education. Her first research experience was on a multi-disciplinary asthma management study led by professors Harry Rea and Stuart McNaughton and was funded by the Medical Research Council.

Professor Smith is well known for her 1998 book, “Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples”, and other writings on research methodologies such as kaupapa Maori research. She is currently a member on the Health Research Council and Chairper­son of Maori Health Council and New Zealand Association for Research in Education.

Professor Smith’s lecture topic is on facilitating Maori student success.

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