Apr 13, 2021

TangataWhenua.com

Maori News & Indigenous Views

Budget 2010 is here – Here’s what the Maori Party say…

1 min read

The 2010 Budget was announced at 2pm today. The NZ Herald is calling this year’s budget the “Biggest tax overhaul in 25 years”. Highlights include the controversial 15% tax hike and tax cuts across the board. For commentary click on the following:

The following tables detail funding that was (1) specifically secured by the Maori Party and (2) influenced by the Maori Party.

18 thoughts on “Budget 2010 is here – Here’s what the Maori Party say…

  1. Maori trusts denied tax help in budget

    Friday 21 May 2010

    The chief executive of the Federation of Maori Authorities says his members have been left out of the corporate tax cut.

    Ron Mark says most Maori incorporations and trusts are taxed at 17.5 percent, and they could have expected yesterday's Budget to preserve relativity with the main tax.

    The former New Zealand first MP says Parliament had good reasons for creating the gap in tax rates in the first place.

    “Everybody knows that Maori trusts and Maori incorporations reinvest hugely back into their businesses, and that is where the advantage and that is where the difference is. If we pay out dividends to our people, our people pay tax accordingly depending on their income as they should be, but there were very specific reasons that parliament decided to reduce the tax rate for Maori trusts, Maori incorporations,” Mr Mark says.

    He says the extra funding for research and development trumpeted in the Budget won't help Maori farmers who want to add value to their products, and he's skeptical the tax cuts will offset the impact the increase in GST will have on Maori families.

    http://www.waatea603am.co.nz/News/2010/May-2/Maor

  2. The Maori Party has secured $19.8 million over four years in government funding for reintegration halfway houses for Maori offenders. By next year, two 16-bed units – known as Whare Oranga Ake – will be ready to house Maori inmates for a nine-month stay to be slowly integrated back into the community. The whare will be reviewed in 2012, after which the capacity of each unit will be doubled to 32 beds. On average the whare will have 42 residents a year. One will be in Auckland, the other in Hawkes Bay. It will be for prisoners who have come to the end of their sentence who will benefit from a slow reintegration into the community.

    http://maorinews.com/karere/

  3. Maori Party co-leader Pita Sharples has revealed the party asked supporters whether it should break its coalition with the National-led Government over the rise in GST. Dr Sharples said party leaders sought advice from electorates ahead of the increase in yesterday’s Budget from 12.5 to 15 per cent. The party wants GST taken off healthy food, but must support the across-the-board rise under the confidence and supply deal with National. “We’ve gone deliberately back to our electorates. We’ve got their total support. We said, `Look, do you want us to not honour the deal we’ve signed up to?’ and they said, `No way. You honour the agreement,”’ Dr Sharples said.

    The comments came as Maori Party MP Hone Harawira said he would boycott the vote on the Budget in protest at the GST increase. “I won’t vote for it. I’m not going to be there. This is not a Maori Party decision; this is a National Party decision, so I won’t be anywhere near the House.”

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/politics/372

  4. BUDGET WILL END PRETENSE

    Labour leader Phil Goff says today's Budget should end any pretense the Maori Party is championing the best interests of Maori people.

    Mr Goff says it's clear the country can expect a shift in wealth from low and middle income earners to the already rich, and widespread cuts in government services.

    He says the Maori Party may vote against much of the government's agenda, but its support agreement means it has to vote in favour of the Budget.

    “They will vote for a rise in GST. They will vote for tax cuts that give most to the very wealthy and least to those that most need it, and that’s the price of getting into bed with the National Party. They knew what the National Party was before they went into the coalition agreement. The National Party is a party that supports the most well off,” Mr Goff says.

  5. MONEY ON BUDGET FOR MAORI REINTEGRATION CENTRES

    A prison rehabilitation advocate is congratulating Maori Party co-leader Pita Sharples for winning funding for two new kaupapa Maori reintegration units for prisoners.

    There's $19.8 million in today's Budget to build and operate the 16-bed Whare Oranga Ake units in Auckland and the Hawkes Bay.

    Kim Workman from Rethinking Crime and Punishment says it's a kaupapa Dr Sharples has pushed for 20 years, though it required him to become Associate Minister of Corrections to finally get his way.

    “There is a potential to reduce offending if people are addressing their cultural needs. Clearly Pita has a framework to do that,” Mr Workman says.

    While the units will cater for just 42 residents a year initially, the scheme could be expanded to 64 beds after a review in 2013.

    SMALL BOOST FOR MAORI TOURISM

    Maori tourism operators are welcoming a $4.5 million boost in the Budget for Maori tourism.

    Kapiti Island Alive head John Barrett, the immediate past president of the Maori Tourism Council, says the sector has struggled for years.

    He says it's good the government now recognises the contribution Maori can make to tourism, and it should be used to plan for the growth of the sector.

    Other Budget measures include developing aa "Brand Maori" to gain premium prices for Maori exports, and support for a delegation of Maori business leaders to the World Expo in Shanghai.

    http://waatea.blogspot.com/

  6. Maori landowners still seek ETS change

    Federation of Maori Authorities chief executive Ron Mark says Maori landowners will be disappointed the Budget did not deliver changes they wanted in the Emissions Trading Scheme.

    He says the ETS, which comes into effect on July 1, means a huge loss for Maori because they own most of the pre-1990 forests which are heavily penalised for any change in land use.

    “We have a lot of land that is currently under pine, beautifully suited to dairy, and a lot of land under sheep and beef which is suited for forestry because of its high risk of erosion, and we’re totally prevented from switching one out and the other in,” Mr Mark says.

    Only a few Maori landowners will benefit from the deal the Government did to win Maori Party support for the ETS, which could allow iwi to plant forests on conservation land for carbon credits.

  7. LITTLE FOR MAORI IN ENGLISH BUDGET

    The chief executive of the Federation of Maori Authorities says there is little for Maori in Bill English's second budget.

    Ron Mark says Maori trusts and incorporations miss out on the cuts to company tax because most are already on a special 17.5 percent rate, and they also won't benefit from changes to funding for research and development.

    The former New Zealand First MP says he's also skeptical about the budget tables which claim to show that the rise in GST to 15 percent will be offset by tax cuts, giving people a chance to save and invest.

    “The thing that I do know is that for low income earners, wage and salary, Maori, they spend everything. They don’t save anything. Everything that comes into their pocket goes out. By the end of the week or the fortnight, it's gone,” Mr Mark says.

    He says the tax changes are for the benefit of the more well off.

  8. Boost for pre-school participation

    The government will spend $91.8 million over the next four years on early childhood education for Maori and Pasifika children.

    Education minister Anne Tolley says she wants to do somethng about the lower participation rates, with only 91 percent of Maori and 85 percent of Pasifika children attending kindergarten, kohanga reo or other pre-school.

    She says a community-based programme in Counties Manukau, started after the 2008 Manukau Early Childhood summit identified long term social problems caused by a lack of pre-school education in the area, has pointed the way forward.

    The programme will initially be developed in five centres around the country.

    “We're targeting another 3500 children to get them into early childhood because we know it has such a significant effect on their readiness for school but it’s working from the community level up. It’s not to be driven by the communities. It’s no good the government rising in and saying ‘this is what you need,’” Mrs Tolley says.

    Funding will come from other areas of early childhood education.

    MAORI TRUSTS DENIED TAX HELP IN BUDGET

    The chief executive of the Federation of Maori Authorities says his members have been left out of the corporate tax cut.

    Ron Mark says most Maori incorporations and trusts are taxed at 17.5 percent, and they could have expected yesterday's Budget to preserve relativity with the main tax.

    The former New Zealand first MP says Parliament had good reasons for creating the gap in tax rates in the first place.

    “Everybody knows that Maori trusts and Maori incorporations reinvest hugely back into their businesses, and that is where the advantage and that is where the difference is. If we pay out dividends to our people, our people pay tax accordingly depending on their income as they should be, but there were very specific reasons that parliament decided to reduce the tax rate for Maori trusts, Maori incorporations,” Mr Mark says.

    He says the extra funding for research and development trumpeted in the Budget won't help Maori farmers who want to add value to their products, and he's skeptical the tax cuts will offset the impact the increase in GST will have on Maori families.

    http://waatea.blogspot.com/

  9. TURIA DEFENDS BUDGET WINDFALL FOR WEALTHY

    Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia is defending the budget's tax breaks for the rich as a fair representation of their value to the country.

    The second Budget under the Maori Party's confidence and supply agreement with National delivered an annual pay rise of more than $300,000 to Telecom chief executive Paul Reynolds, and about $3 a week to someone in the Tuhoe area, where the average income is just $22,000.

    Mrs Turia says there is a limit to what people are prepared to pay in tax.

    “The top earners pay the most tax in the first instance and that money is therefore available to ensure we’ve got the health and social services and other services we need for people who simply can’t afford to pay for those things,” Mrs Turia says.

    The Maori Party has identified $266 million in budget spending which will be for the direct benefit of Maori.

  10. Budget boost allows kaupapa to grow

    The driving force behind a South Auckland initiative to increase Maori and Pacific participation in early childhood education is ecstatic about a Budget day boost for the kaupapa.

    The Government says $91.8 million dollars will be spent rolling out the Manukau Education Trust's model to other centres around the country.

    Trust chair Colleen Brown says a key element is building early childhood centres on school grounds, so there is a seamless transition from pre-school to primary school.

    “Now that has presented some challenges for the Ministry of Education because essentially they are building on Ministry of Education land but then it is a community organisation that runs it so that’s a huge step away from where government thinking has been,” Ms Brown says.

    The Manukau scheme emerged from a taskforce looking at long term responses to the death of the Kahui twins.

  11. MAORI TOURISM COUNCIL WELCOMES $4.5M IN STRATEGY SPEND

    The Maori Tourism Council is praising a $4.5 million investment into the sector.

    Its chief executive, Pania Tyson-Nathan, says the money in last week’s Budget will be available on a contestable basis to operators promote to promote Maori tourism.

    She says the industry is poised for growth and the extra fund will allow Maori to show themselves to the world as never before.

    “Maori are absolutely elated to see a budget as recognition there is room for Maori tourism in the wider New Zealand tourism space,” she says.

    http://waatea.blogspot.com/

  12. 'Budget thumbs down from community health workers'

    The head of Maori community health workers collective Te Whiringa believes last week’s budget will hit low income Maori hard.

    Riripeti Haretuku says while the government says no one will be worse off, the reality is that retailers are already starting to increase the price of basic commodities in preparation for October’s GST increase.

    She says increases in property taxes are likely to be passed on to tenants.

    “The impact it will have on people whop are currently renting is they are

    likely to have to absorb rent costs as well on top of that. This is a

    population that is already hard pressed with what they are trying to

    cope with now,” Ms Haretuku says.

    Te Whiringa will try to make the Maori Party aware of the negative impact the budget has on low income whanau.'

  13. Budget Decimates the Workers

    “The government’s 2010 budget decimates the lower and middle income workers by increasing the GST as it will result in inflation accelerating to 6%,” Alton Shameem the Founder and President of Fiji Club of New Zealand (FCNZ) said today at Takapuna, North Shore City, Auckland the City of Workers.

    “To further inflict destruction of the low and middle income workers the ominous and enormously unpopular Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) to be introduced soon will rocket propelled the inflation and cause dire economic and social hardship to the most vulnerable in our society the lower and middle income earners,” Alton Shameem Chairman and President of Fiji Club of New Zealand (FCNZ) said.

    “The higher income earners are the only winners in this National-led government’s 2010 budget and they will be laughing, rejoicing and smiling all the way to the bank while the lower and middle income workers will be struggling to put food on the table and provide the basic necessities for their families” Alton Shameem the Community Leader and President of Fiji Club of New Zealand (FCNZ) said.

    “ What the government should have done to really and meaningfully help the lower and middle workers was to have no increase in GST, taxation thresholds of income up to $14, 000 and from $14, 001 to $40, 000 be taxed at zero and 12.5% respectively,” Alton Shameem the Chairman of Fiji Club of New Zealand (FCNZ) said.

    Alton Shameem JP

    B.A. (Prof. Acctg/Admin), COP (Econs), CPPA, ICSA (13 papers) (Lond), Dip. LIA, Cert. Com. Studies, Adv. Cert. Acctg (Lond), Cert. ESOL H. Tutoring.

    Founder/ Leader/ Chairman/ President

  14. Budget supports M?ori business and innovation

    Budget 2010 provides support in several areas for M?ori business to contribute to the economic recovery and help M?ori get ahead under their own steam, M?ori Affairs Minister Pita Sharples says.

    “$4.5 million of new money has been allocated to grow M?ori productivity and export growth, and to support M?ori innovation. A further $4.5 million has been set aside for initiatives currently being developed to strengthen and promote M?ori tourism.

    “The M?ori asset base is concentrated in dairy, tourism, meat, wood and seafood – most of New Zealand’s key export earners. There are huge potential economic returns from our $3 million investment in skills and training for M?ori in the primary sector.

    “Key drivers of growth for M?ori in the ‘innovation economy’ include the creation of knowledge and innovation, technological advances, research and development, and education and skills,” Dr Sharples says.

    The Government has allocated $1.5 million for Iwi/M?ori partnerships with the Government to identify priorities in science.

    “M?ori culture offers a unique point to differentiate New Zealand’s services and activities to tourists. $4.5 million has been set aside for initiatives currently being developed to strengthen leadership of the M?ori tourism sector; to improve our M?ori tourism product and to promote M?ori tourism.”

    Other Budget 2010 initiatives include developing a ‘Brand M?ori’ to gain premium prices for M?ori-produced goods exported to niche markets and support for a delegation of M?ori business leaders at the World Expo in Shanghai, to be funded from existing allocations.

    “I will head the delegation to the Shanghai Expo 2010 in September, to help M?ori businesses enter growth industries, to increase M?ori exports, and to increase the profile of M?ori tourism experiences to overseas providers and visitors,” Dr Sharples says

    “M?ori economic growth is good for M?ori and good for the nation.”

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PA1005/S00305.htm

  15. Turia rewrites history

    Tariana Turia is attempting to rewrite history to deflect attention from her support for the GST increase says a Maori unionist.

    Syd Keepa convener of Kai Mahi Council of Trade Unions Runanga says he is angry and disappointed at Turia’s budget speech blaming the unions for the lack of job training for unemployed Maori during the 1980’s and 1990’s.

    “Throughout those dark days the union movement and the unemployed movement were lonely voices calling for proper training for real jobs,” he says.

    “Ms Turia’s new mates in the National Party and among the employers and financial elites were totally opposed to meaningful training or job creation because they said it interfered with the market.

    “It was them that had the power to determine policy, not the union movement which was totally shut out from decision making.

    “Maori unemployment is 13.3% compared to 6.4% for all others. Ms Turia is part of a government whose only response to soaring Maori unemployment is a massive tax handout to the rich and hammering low income Maori with a GST increase.

    “Once again unions’ calls for meaningful action on jobs are falling on deaf ears, the only difference is that this time Ms Turia has lined up with the rich and powerful to deny Maori the opportunities they deserve.”

    Mr Keepa says thousand of Maori workers have been loyal unionists for generations because their experience is that over a period of time unions provide a collective voice and practical organisation to continue their struggle for a decent standard of living.

    “Maori unionists would like to sit down with the Maori Party and begin a dialogue on how to address our shared concerns on how to the needs of the increasing number of Maori unemployed,” he says.

    Ends

    Contact

    Syd Keepa, Convener Kai Mahi Council of Trade Unions Runanga

    021776025

  16. Maori enterprises encouraged to expand (NZH, Yvonne Tahana)

    Maori exporter firms and tourism operators will receive $9 million from this year's budget to grow their businesses, and accountability targets will be high, says Maori Affairs Minister Dr Pita Sharples.

    His Economic Taskforce has oversight of the $4.5 million targeted at growing export earnings. Dr Sharples said that with Maori assets concentrated in dairy, tourism, meat, wood and seafood an emphasis would be placed on adding value to primary products.

    However, with a cloud hanging over the suspended Tekau Plus project which was paid for by Te Puni Kokiri and was supposed to have seen 10 Maori companies earn $10 million within a decade but has delivered nothing substantial, the Maori Party co-leader said scrutiny would be high.

    "I'm not about to have my taskforce not be accountable – they realise that they're in the minister's hands."

    Tourism operators will receive $4.5 million to develop leadership in the sector, improve Maori tourism products and promotion.

    Exact details of which groups would receive the money was still unclear as the project was still in its infancy, Dr Sharples said.

    An extra $6.5 million over three years is aimed at the Government's 2014 target for settling all historical Treaty claims.

    Treaty Negotiations Minister Christopher Finlayson said that since the last Budget the pace had accelerated, with 11 agreement in principles and six deeds of settlement completed.

    The funding would provide resources for Crown chief negotiators, extra support staff and hasten the drafting of deeds. "More groups are also keen to ramp up the speed of their negotiations, since they have seen the benefits that settling claims in a timely fashion can bring for their people, by creating new jobs and unlocking economic development opportunities," Mr Finlayson said.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_i

  17. Kia ora koutou and greetings all,

    Being ‘Budget Day’ I wanted to get an email out to our current mailing list/s with the direct link to the 2010 Budget information on Vote: Housing.

    Bill English in his Budget speech has stated: “The Government retains an on-going commitment to growing the supply of affordable housing for New Zealanders and their families. $20 million has been provided to extend Housing New Zealand’s Housing Innovation Fund for another year”.

    Two links of direct relevance are:

    o Treasury website: Housing Vote (goes straight to PDF) http://www.treasury.govt.nz/budget/2010/estimates/est10h...

    o Beehive website – Minister of Housing, Phil Heatley: http://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/government+extends+co...

    The CHA office is now looking at the content of the Budget and will be scanning media coverage so that we are in the best position to highlight changes of most interest to you, our members and stakeholders, and to make any public responses as needed.

    I also wanted to take this opportunity to let you know that CHA will soon be putting a clearer more-user friendly website in place on the web, and will then be resuming a more regular and more targeted ‘CHA Snapshots’ email from next month.

    Meanwhile please don’t hesitate to contact me at any time with your views or input on the issues that are impacting on provision of community housing in your region.

    Best regards, David

    David McCartney

    Executive Officer

    Community Housing Aotearoa

  18. $18,000

    Tax cut that John Key will give himself in 2010.

    $400

    Tax cut for average M?ori in 2010.

    45

    Times that John Key’s tax cut is bigger the average M?ori.

    GST rise will hurt poor the most

    NZ Herald headline, 30 Jan 2010

    $500,000

    Wage of Chief Executive of Supercity.

    $25,000

    Size of his tax cut.

    Budget gifts for the Rich

    Dominion Post headline, 18 May 2010

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.