Writing about the Maori World a key concern of the writer and historian Michael King will be the focus of a writing workshop to be held next February.

Ta te Ao Maori: Writing the Maori Worldis the third writers residential workshop run by the Michael King Writers Centre. The centre was established in 2005 in memory of King who died in 2004, and aims to support New Zealand writers and to promote all aspects of New Zealand’s literature, including fiction and non-fiction. Trustees say the writing workshops complement the residencies provided for working writers at the Writers Centre.

The February workshop is aimed at experienced writers (Maori and Pakeha) with a specialised interest in writing the Maori world.

It will offer stimulating discusssion on translation, writing in te reo Maori, adaptation, history, biography and book and web publishing.

The workshop is limited to 24 participants: a few emerging writers but mostly professional writers or academics who have published many articles and books.

Another eighteen senior writers and publishers will speak, lead panel discusssions and chair sessions, most staying on for further discussion and some staying over.

The workshop convenors are both writers with several books to their credit and strong connections to the Writers Centre: Paul Diamond (Ngati Haua, Te Rarawa and Ngapuhi), and Bradford Haami (Ngati Awa, Ngati Kahungunu, Kai Tahu, Tuwharetoa). Haami held the first Maori Writers Residency at the Writers Centre in 2010.

Diamond was a speaker on biography at previous residential workshops.

Diamond is excited the Writers Centre has chosen writing the Maori world as the theme for its third workshop. Its a rare opportunity to share expertise and experience in writing about many different aspects of Te Ao Maori and how to go about getting that writing published.

Participants will hear from writers Witi Ihimaera, Merimeri Penfold, Anne Salmond, Monty

Soutar, Aroha Harris, Jock Phillips, Basil Keane, Paul Moon, Jane McRae, and Darryn Joseph and publishers Robyn Bargh, Geoff Walker, Sam Elworthy and John Huria.

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