Response to Godfrey’s korero on ‘wedge’ politics and Maori | Thor

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Morgan Godfreys Opinion piece, based on Shane Jones statement about the emerging brotocracy (my words) deserves widest dissemination as a key issue in the important debate about Maori economic and social circumstances.
Jones is dead right about senior iwi members lining up to aggrandise themselves with further investments in state-owned assets, which have no trickle-down factor.Godfrey identifies the failure of the top-down approach where the tribal executives along with a few privileged families live high, while the solo mothers receive nothing.

This is the fundamental issue for Maori do they want to become effectively landlords living on the rent, or roll up their sleeves, defeat the tribal hierarchy and ensure those assets work for the benefit of the widest group of Maori in delivering up-skilling, jobs and social benefits.

We have a perfect example in our own back yard of Ngati Porou Seafoods (NPS), sitting on its fishing quota asset and leasing it out (not for much longer judging by growing government and public disapproval) to charter fishing boats using sweated labour from the worlds poorest countries.

NPS should be running its own trawlers and a Maritime Training School for the young Ngati Porou, who are currently presented with either forestry jobs or hoeing squash as limited vocational options.

Despite a payroll of more than 20, NPS only manages to run one fish and chips shop and it trucks the fish in from Napier!

Judging by the brotocrat vehicle fleet and the big groups who swan into the top restaurants, there is conspicuous Maori wealth in Gisborne but the trickle down is nowhere to be seen.

Sitting back and waiting for major assets to be returned (or imagining that an oil strike on your land will solve all your problems) in the expectation that everyone will be on easy street, has been discredited by the Maori elite as Morgan Godfrey so accurately portrays them.

THOR

(Gisborne Herald)

2 COMMENTS

  1. Our Tribal Trust Boards must soon come to a time of reckoning. We look to government to end our woes when in reality our troubles begin at home.

  2. Totally agree. The corporate arms of Iwi are not letting the putea they have recieved on behalf of their beneficiaries trickle down to them. Yes they certainly are wanting,trying and indeed in some cases succeeding in increasing the Iwi Assett base but in doing this, still the ones in most need of financial help get left out. It is indeed time to roll up our sleeves, get in boots and all and direct those at the top to also change their ways or re-elect new people in.

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