New technology seeks to safeguard knowledge of whanau, hapu, iwi and marae

New technology seeks to safeguard knowledge of whanau, hapu, iwi and marae

TangataWhenua.com have watched as indigenous communities have planted their unique stories, precious images and detailed content within these newly developing digital landscapes. But how can whanau, hapu, iwi and marae protect their indigenous and traditional knowledge (TK)?

As some of you will already be aware indigenous communities around the world are interested in these issues too. And thanks to Ariana Tikao, Research Librarian, Maori at the Alexander Turnbull Library who passed this link on, there is technogloy available that will help you share and protect your TK.

The developers of Mukurtu have created Traditional Knowledge Licenses, similar to the Creative Commons licenses.

Mukurtu is a free and open source community content management system that provides international standards-based tools adaptable to the local cultural protocols and intellectual property systems of Indigenous communities, libraries, archives, and museums. The CMS serves as a flexible archival tool that allows users to protect, preserve and share digital cultural heritage through Mukurtu Core steps and unique Traditional Knowledge licenses.

These developers have also looked into the issue of copyright and have options which you can use or customise to the needs of your whanau, hapu, iwi and marae.

http://www.mukurtu.org/wiki/Manual:Traditional_Knowledge_Licenses (these licenses can potentially be used to help protect images and other forms of knowledge relating to our taonga. You can specify that the source community needs to be acknowledged and a non-commercial basis for re-use etc)

The director of Mukurtu is considering coming to Aotearoa to talk to interested groups here, if you are interested, email us and we’ll pass your enquiry on.

Background

The Mukurtu project began in the remote Central Australian town of Tennant Creek with the creation of the Mukurtu Wumpurrarni-kari Archive. The project was born from the needs of the Warumungu Aboriginal community who wanted a system to archive and organize their digital cultural materials in line with their cultural protocols. We collaborated to develop a user-friendly and culturally relevant system embedded with Warumungu social and cultural protocols.

The word “mukurtu” in Warumungu means “dilly bag.” Dilly bags hold sacred items and are accessible by acting responsibly within the community and gaining the permission of knowledgeable community leaders. Like the dilly bag the archive is a “safe keeping place,” a community repository for cultural materials and knowledge. The Warumungu community maintains the archive at the Nynikka Nyunyu Art and Culture Centre where people access their materials, deposit new content, add knowledge and information to existing content, and create new materials.

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  • DigitalMaoriRT @mokai77: “@JodiIhaka: Karakia done. Now let's debate this! http://t.co/c0vJi8zjjt” @DigitalMaori about 17 minutes ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @mokai77: I guess Trelise Cooper didn't get the cultural appropriation memo. 😡 about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @di_f_w: Of course @trelisecooper knows appropriating the Native American headdress is offensive. This is an attempt to profit off peopl… about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @di_f_w: I have long believed @trelisecooper to be the most boring, unimaginative fashion designer in NZ and cheap shots like this just … about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaori@Knhannah @trelisecooper we'd love 1000 words :) about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @Knhannah: Anyone who fashion blogs and would like 1000 words on what is wring with @trelisecooper's cultural appropriation, I'm your wo… about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @MorganGodfery: When will designers realise that appropriating Native American war bonnets isn't innovative, but an act of deep conformi… about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @caniwikiwi: @trelisecooper As someone who was a 70's hipster I can say for sure we did not wear the ceremonial dress of First Nations. … about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @caniwikiwi: @trelisecooper Women never wear the ceremonial headdress of First Nations chiefs. Would you dress near naked girls in a ko… about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @RPamatatau: Pondering what the (fashion) press might write about Dame @trelisecooper and her cultural looting #NZFW14 #mercedes about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @mokai77: @caniwikiwi @RPamatatau @trelisecooper or pin fake bic cross medals on? War bonnets are only worn by returned warriors. about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @puawai_: Reading comments on Trelise Cooper's facey about the 'bohemian vibe' war bonnet. This is why I hate nostalgia. White people pi… about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @Eliota_Sapolu: Thats utter crap @trelisecooper Cultural theft at its finest! about 14 hours ago
  • DigitalMaoriRT @spat106: Trelise Cooper alters pic of her model wearing a Native American headdress as her intention is not to be racist. http://t.co/K… about 14 hours ago
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